Manuscript Americana
Do you have any original cookbooks with a recipe for Johnny Cakes ?? I am an Innkeeper in The Hudson Valley and am interested.
Anonymous

As a matter of fact, we do. They are written in native Cherokee, so you might want a translator. I do speak and write Cherokee, and will be happy to for a slight additional fee to work on this for you. Our manuscript cookbooks range from $85 to $3,550 and that includes tax and shipping within the lower 48. Please let us know if we may assist, and many thanks for the courtesy of your enquiry.

I am looking for the original manuscript of Captain John Mason's Brief History of the Pequot War (1636-1638). The history would have been written ca. 1660 and was first published in 1736 by Rev. Thomas Prince of Boston. Do you know where the original MS is?
Anonymous

Unfortunately, I do not know. Your question is fascinating. I can search a bit in my indices and let you know what I come up with. Please reply to me at peter.pehrson@yahoo.com and give me your email. I do know I don’t have the ms.! Where have you looked? Cheers ~ Peter

Do you still have the A.A. Guthrie letter that you have posted?
Anonymous

Yes, that is available. Please email me at peter.pehrson@yahoo.com if you are interested. 

Bank letter regarding draft to Mrs. Margaret Connor. January 4, 1904.
Presumably the dog depiction is meant to convey steadfastness and dependability, characteristics one would find desirable in a bank.
Wove sheet, 8-1/2” wide x 11” high, watermarked “Creme Bond.”
We will be pleased to offer this item with our compliments at no cost to the first person who responds to this posting. The favor of your reply to peter.pehrson@yahoo.com will set the wheels in motion.

Bank letter regarding draft to Mrs. Margaret Connor. January 4, 1904.

Presumably the dog depiction is meant to convey steadfastness and dependability, characteristics one would find desirable in a bank.

Wove sheet, 8-1/2” wide x 11” high, watermarked “Creme Bond.”

We will be pleased to offer this item with our compliments at no cost to the first person who responds to this posting. The favor of your reply to peter.pehrson@yahoo.com will set the wheels in motion.

Bartender Oaths not to serve underaged “white or colored.”
Dooly County, Georgia. 
S. A. Land, January 5, 1874.
J. R. Burnett, December 1, 1874.

One leaf, holographs on each side. 7-1/2” wide x 5-5/8” high, without folds. 

Final Mittimus. Portage County, Ohio. January 5, 1877.
John C. Haines remanded to jail.

A personal appearance bond was required in the amount of $200 and since he “failed to procure,” was sent to jail. Haines “unlawfully violently and in menacing manner did assault and threaten the said Sarah A Haines…John C Haines then and there did beat wound and illtreat and other wrongs to the said Sarah A Haines…” Note “Constable’s Fees for Service .40 / Cop .25 / Mileage $1.35 / /Transportation $3.00”

8” wide x 6-1/4” high open and unfolded, wove sheet without watermark. 

12-volume diary set.
Doris (neé Green) Campbell.
Mumford, and Monroe County, New York.
1951, 1976-78, 1981-82, 1984-86, 1988-89.

Daily activities of Doris Campbell and husband Junior (George Campbell, Jr.) in upstate New York near Rochester and covering more than 38 years.

Doris Campbell (1916 - 2001) was born to Howard and Blanche (neé Taggart) Green in LeRoy, New York. This is rich territory for researching and understanding aspects of a dynamic domestic emotional landscape. In recording her husband’s behavior, we learn:


“Wed - 5/17 [1989] 49o - 79o / Sunny - Warmer - Jr got the papers — I spoke about getting the sink drain fixed and he started raving — I’ve got so much to do — the drain and the grass is growing so fast — Next will be the septic tank—Cut a few weeds when I walked by the driveway. I watched TV—Jr slept awhile—Went to bed at 8—I went at 10—”

“Thurs 5/18 [1989] 51o - 85o..Cut some dandelions in A.M. Jr got nasty after dinner — I told him the water in the sink went down OK. He started to yell because I hadn’t put stuff in it lately to clean it out—Its outdoors that is plugged not inside—got very bad in p.m. …” 

“Sun 5/21 [1989] 56o - 82o …Jr wanted to call Howard. I checked phone bill and said we called him last but he didnt agree—I figured calling about 9 but he called [—]. Down at the cottage. Beth sounded grand. Jr ugly afterwards. Sun came out. Wanted to cut some dandelions in P.M. but Mark was mowing—Our grass is above our knees and I didn’t want to call attention to it…”

Sun 6/4 [1989] 58o - 72o…I took a walk at 10—too wet—grass is so high and mosquitoes so numerous—I bauled [sic]—I wish he would do something about the grass—Hasn’t been mowed in a year…”

Twelve volumes total, comprising nine volumes in annual date books from “T. M. Skivington Independent Insurance Agency” in Caledonia, NY, measuring 5-1/4” wide x 8-1/4” high x 1/2” thick, all in plasticized leather wraps with comb bindings, all very good to excellent; one volume in college notebook of equal dimensions, and two volumes in conventional page-a-day arrangement. This is a significant modern collection with much to yield for the institutional, or advanced private, collector. The favor of your enquiry to peter.pehrson@yahoo.com for price and other details will garner the promptest attention. 

Collector’s Pointers - Auction Catalogues as Reference Material.

Don’t let an auction catalogue go by; they can be valuable reference sources for manuscript Americana. Sometimes treasures will be hidden as in the case of the Henkels catalogue (illus. 2 and 3) from 1924. While “rare American history” and postage stamps were the purported highlights on the title page (illus. 2), there were indeed mansucripts available, see items 444, 447 - 448. Reading and researching old catalogues helps focus a collector’s habits, and provides invaluable background.

We have large holdings in sets of old Americana auction catalogues, covering many such subjects as maritime and nautical, as well as various aspects of history. The favor of your enquiry to peter.pehrson@yahoo.com will receive the promptest attention.

Receipt. Woodward & Wight, Ship Chandlers. New Orleans. March 4, 1881.Supplies for the mess of USS KEARSARGE.
“The first KEARSARGE was launched on 11 September 1861 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, NH; sponsored by Mrs. Henry McFarland, wife of the editor of the ‘Concord Statesmen’, and commissioned 24 January 1862 with Captain Charles W. Pickering in command.
 
"The Sloop of War KEARSARGE departed Portsmouth 5 February 1862 for the coast of Spain to join in the blockade of Confederate raiders. Captain John A. Winslow, took command of the KEARSARGE on April 8, 1863, while she remained in European waters searching for raiders. Arriving in Cherbourg, France on 14 June 1864, she found the Confederate Ship ALABAMA in port. On June 19, ALABAMA stood out of Cherbourg Harbor for her last action. Careful of French neutrality, KEARSARGE’S new commanding officer, Captain Winslow, took the sloop of war well clear of territorial waters, then turned to meet the Confederate cruiser. ALABAMA fired first but the battle quickly turned against her and within an hour the ALABAMA had been reduced to a sinking wreck and her Captain Raphael Semmes struck his colors and surrendered.
"KEARSARGE rescued the majority of the ALABAMA’s survivors; but Captain Semmes and 41 others were picked up by a British yacht. Captain Winslow was promoted to Commodore and the New York Chamber of Commerce honored him, the KEARSARGE, and her crew, mainly men from New Hampshire, for their victory.
"The KEARSARGE returned to sea and the coast of Spain in April 1865 in search of Confederate ships. After cruising the Mediterranean and the English Channel south to Liberia, the KEARSARGE returned to the Boston Navy Yard in August 1866.
"In January 1868 KEARSARGE sailed to serve in the South Pacific and along the coast of South America to protect American interests for the next four years. She later performed similar duties in the Asiatic waters of Japan, China and the Philippines. During this time she carried Professor Hall’s scientific party from Nagasaki, Japan, to Vladivostok, Russia, to observe the transit of Venus.
"The last assignment for the KEARSARGE was protecting American interests in the West Indies, off Venezuela and along the Central Americas. On February 2, 1894, on Roncador Reef off the coast of Nicaragua, the KEARSARGE was wrecked. Having attained the rank of Rear Admiral, Winslow’s years of service continued long after the famous sea battle. He died in Boston on September 29, 1873."—-Information courtesy of http://www.warner.nh.us/
Here is a picture of this ship: www.warner.nh.us/sloop.htm

Receipt. Woodward & Wight, Ship Chandlers. New Orleans. March 4, 1881.
Supplies for the mess of USS KEARSARGE.

The first KEARSARGE was launched on 11 September 1861 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, NH; sponsored by Mrs. Henry McFarland, wife of the editor of the ‘Concord Statesmen’, and commissioned 24 January 1862 with Captain Charles W. Pickering in command.

"The Sloop of War KEARSARGE departed Portsmouth 5 February 1862 for the coast of Spain to join in the blockade of Confederate raiders. Captain John A. Winslow, took command of the KEARSARGE on April 8, 1863, while she remained in European waters searching for raiders. Arriving in Cherbourg, France on 14 June 1864, she found the Confederate Ship ALABAMA in port. On June 19, ALABAMA stood out of Cherbourg Harbor for her last action. Careful of French neutrality, KEARSARGE’S new commanding officer, Captain Winslow, took the sloop of war well clear of territorial waters, then turned to meet the Confederate cruiser. ALABAMA fired first but the battle quickly turned against her and within an hour the ALABAMA had been reduced to a sinking wreck and her Captain Raphael Semmes struck his colors and surrendered.

"KEARSARGE rescued the majority of the ALABAMA’s survivors; but Captain Semmes and 41 others were picked up by a British yacht. Captain Winslow was promoted to Commodore and the New York Chamber of Commerce honored him, the KEARSARGE, and her crew, mainly men from New Hampshire, for their victory.

"The KEARSARGE returned to sea and the coast of Spain in April 1865 in search of Confederate ships. After cruising the Mediterranean and the English Channel south to Liberia, the KEARSARGE returned to the Boston Navy Yard in August 1866.

"In January 1868 KEARSARGE sailed to serve in the South Pacific and along the coast of South America to protect American interests for the next four years. She later performed similar duties in the Asiatic waters of Japan, China and the Philippines. During this time she carried Professor Hall’s scientific party from Nagasaki, Japan, to Vladivostok, Russia, to observe the transit of Venus.

"The last assignment for the KEARSARGE was protecting American interests in the West Indies, off Venezuela and along the Central Americas. On February 2, 1894, on Roncador Reef off the coast of Nicaragua, the KEARSARGE was wrecked. Having attained the rank of Rear Admiral, Winslow’s years of service continued long after the famous sea battle. He died in Boston on September 29, 1873."
—-Information courtesy of http://www.warner.nh.us/

Here is a picture of this ship: www.warner.nh.us/sloop.htm

Butter and Eggs Wholesale.
Letter from brother Edward as signed (presum. the eponymous E. B. Higley) to sister Mary.
January 22, 1896.

Detailed account of brother’s life at that moment when he is without a typewriter; the business has killed, dressed, and shipped 200,00 pounds (of chickens) since November; he continues to think of his deceased wife and their 40 years of marriage; and will hire Mary O’Keeffe at $15 a month to be bookkeeper.

Two leaves 8-1/2” wide x 11” high written on one side each. Wove stationery without watermark in a bright and cheerful butter yellow. From a two-letter Higley collection; sixty dollars for both postpaid.